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Wednesday June 23, 2010
NDP MP Charlie Angus Responds to Moore's Attacks
The House of Commons is shut down due to today's earthquake, but I have received a copy of a release from the office of NDP MP Charlie Angus which responds to Canadian Heritage Minister James Moore's attack on fair copyright.  The NDP planned to issue the release today, but cannot due to the office closure.  I was given permission to post the release in its entirety. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEJUNE 23, 2010 NEW DEMOCRATS CALL MOORE OFFSIDE FOR ATTACKING FAIR COPYRIGHT ADVOCATESMinister’s description of ‘radical extremists’ shows he’s in need of a time-out  
TIMMINS – Speaking at a G20 Chamber of Commerce event, Heritage Minister James Moore inexplicably lashed out at those who have raised concerns with his new copyright bill, C-32. Moore characterised fair copyright advocates as “babyish” and enemies of any copyright reform whatsoever. He called them “radical extremists” who must be “confronted every step of the way until they are defeated.” New Democrat Digital Affairs Critic Charlie Angus (Timmins-James Bay) said Moore’s comments are reminiscent of a war-time call-to-arms and are way out of line.

“Attacking teachers, students, artists and consumers who have legitimate questions about this legislation is ridiculous,” said Angus. “Instead of understanding and appreciating the nuances of balanced copyright, the Minister is appearing hyper-defensive and bombastic. I think he needs a time out.”

In his speech to the conference, Moore claimed the government’s attack on consumer rights are necessitated by Canada’s international obligations under the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) treaties.  Angus says Moore simply has his facts wrong.

“James Moore shouldn’t hide behind international treaties to excuse the significant stumbling blocks he has put into the bill. All the experts, including those civil servants who drafted the bill, agree that it could be WIPO-compliant without his push for American-style protection for digital locks,” said Angus. “The Tories are pushing this failed agenda that will criminalize perfectly reasonable behaviour and deny educators legal access to works which they should logically have.”

Angus says Moore needs to tone down the rhetoric and get down to the serious business of working with all stakeholders on amendments that will improve the legislation.

“A Minister shouldn’t resort to name calling or start a war with fair-copyright advocates just because he doesn’t like the feedback he’s getting on Twitter,” said Angus.  “If Moore spent more time listening to the educators, experts, academics and artists who have serious issues with this bill, maybe his public statements wouldn’t be so out of line with everyday Canadians who simply want balanced legislation.”

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For more information please contact:

George Soule, Caucus Press Secretary: 613-850-3448 or souleg@parl.gc.ca

The House of Commons is shut down due to today's earthquake, but I have received a copy of a release from the office of NDP MP Charlie Angus which responds to Canadian Heritage Minister James Moore's attack on fair copyright.  The NDP planned to issue the release today, but cannot due to the office closure.  I was given permission to post the release in its entirety.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JUNE 23, 2010

NEW DEMOCRATS CALL MOORE OFFSIDE FOR ATTACKING FAIR COPYRIGHT ADVOCATES
Minister’s description of ‘radical extremists’ shows he’s in need of a time-out


 

Thursday January 7, 2010
Angus Calls on Clement to Require Net Neutrality Checks
SaveOurNet.ca points to a letter written by NDP MP Charlie Angus to Industry Minister Tony Clement late last year on net neutrality.  The money paragraph focuses on the enforcement side of the CRTC's Internet traffic management guidelines: I urge you to do what is in your power to curtail ISP's discriminatory traffic-shaping practices. In order to make Net Neutrality a reality in Canada, I would ask that you direct the CRTC to adopt it as part of Canada's internet policy, and enforce it through regular compliance checks of ISP traffic. As the traffic management guidelines take effect, Canadians should begin to see more detailed disclosure of ISP traffic management practices and the possibility of complaints or investigations.
angus on net neutrality

SaveOurNet.ca points to a letter written by NDP MP Charlie Angus to Industry Minister Tony Clement late last year on net neutrality.  The money paragraph focuses on the enforcement side of the CRTC's Internet traffic management guidelines:

I urge you to do what is in your power to curtail ISP's discriminatory traffic-shaping practices. In order to make Net Neutrality a reality in Canada, I would ask that you direct the CRTC to adopt it as part of Canada's internet policy, and enforce it through regular compliance checks of ISP traffic.

As the traffic management guidelines take effect, Canadians should begin to see more detailed disclosure of ISP traffic management practices and the possibility of complaints or investigations.

Sunday July 5, 2009
The Angus Net Neutrality Bill
NDP MP Charlie Angus introduced his private member's net neutrality bill in the House of Commons this afternoon. The short bill seeks to add transparency, neutral network management, and open devices to the Canadian telecom law framework: Network operators shall not engage in network management practices that favour, degrade or prioritize any content, application or service transmitted over a broadband network based on their source, ownership or destination. The bill includes several notable exceptions to this general principle, including action to provide computer security, prioritize emergency communications, offer differentiated pricing or bit caps, anti-spam filters, handle breaches in terms of service, and to prevent violation of the law. The bill also focuses on open devices and greater transparency. It provides that "network operators shall not prevent or obstruct a user from attaching any device to their network, provided the device does not physically damage the network or unreasonably degrade the use of the network by other subscribers." Further, it requires that "network operators shall provide and make available to each user information about the user’s access to the Internet, including the speed, nature, and limitations of the user's broadband service at any given time." The bill is hardly the "regulate the Internet" approach anti-net neutrality advocates would suggest, but rather is a measured response that deserves broad support.
angus net neutrality bill

NDP MP Charlie Angus introduced his private member's net neutrality bill in the House of Commons this afternoon. The short bill seeks to add transparency, neutral network management, and open devices to the Canadian telecom law framework:

Network operators shall not engage in network management practices that favour, degrade or prioritize any content, application or service transmitted over a broadband network based on their source, ownership or destination.

The bill includes several notable exceptions to this general principle, including action to provide computer security, prioritize emergency communications, offer differentiated pricing or bit caps, anti-spam filters, handle breaches in terms of service, and to prevent violation of the law.

The bill also focuses on open devices and greater transparency. It provides that "network operators shall not prevent or obstruct a user from attaching any device to their network, provided the device does not physically damage the network or unreasonably degrade the use of the network by other subscribers." Further, it requires that "network operators shall provide and make available to each user information about the user’s access to the Internet, including the speed, nature, and limitations of the user's broadband service at any given time." The bill is hardly the "regulate the Internet" approach anti-net neutrality advocates would suggest, but rather is a measured response that deserves broad support.

Angus Introduces Net Neutrality Bill

Charlie Angus, the NDP digital affairs critic, has introduced a net neutrality bill. The private member's bill is C-398. More details to come.

Charlie Angus on Digital Issues and the Election

P2PNet.net publishes an editorial by NDP MP Charlie Angus on the election and key digital issues such as copyright and net neutrality.

Wednesday May 28, 2008
The Angus Net Neutrality Bill
NDP MP Charlie Angus introduced his private member's net neutrality bill in the House of Commons this afternoon.  The short bill seeks to add transparency, neutral network management, and open devices to the Canadian telecom law framework: Network operators shall not engage in network management practices that favour, degrade or prioritize any content, application or service transmitted over a broadband network based on their source, ownership or destination. The bill includes several notable exceptions to this general principle, including action to provide computer security, prioritize emergency communications, offer differentiated pricing or bit caps, anti-spam filters, handle breaches in terms of service, and to prevent violation of the law. The bill also focuses on open devices and greater transparency.  It provides that "network operators shall not prevent or obstruct a user from attaching any device to their network, provided the device does not physically damage the network or unreasonably degrade the use of the network by other subscribers."  Further, it requires that "network operators shall provide and make available to each user information about the user’s access to the Internet, including the speed, nature, and limitations of the user's broadband service at any given time."  The bill is hardly the "regulate the Internet" approach anti-net neutrality advocates would suggest, but rather is a measured response that deserves broad support.
angus net neutrality bill

NDP MP Charlie Angus introduced his private member's net neutrality bill in the House of Commons this afternoon.  The short bill seeks to add transparency, neutral network management, and open devices to the Canadian telecom law framework:

Network operators shall not engage in network management practices that favour, degrade or prioritize any content, application or service transmitted over a broadband network based on their source, ownership or destination.

The bill includes several notable exceptions to this general principle, including action to provide computer security, prioritize emergency communications, offer differentiated pricing or bit caps, anti-spam filters, handle breaches in terms of service, and to prevent violation of the law.

The bill also focuses on open devices and greater transparency.  It provides that "network operators shall not prevent or obstruct a user from attaching any device to their network, provided the device does not physically damage the network or unreasonably degrade the use of the network by other subscribers."  Further, it requires that "network operators shall provide and make available to each user information about the user’s access to the Internet, including the speed, nature, and limitations of the user's broadband service at any given time."  The bill is hardly the "regulate the Internet" approach anti-net neutrality advocates would suggest, but rather is a measured response that deserves broad support.

Angus to Introduce Net Neutrality Bill

The CBC reports that hundreds of people attended the net neutrality on Parliament Hill and NDP MP Charlie Angus announced that he plans to introduce a Private Member's bill addressing the net neutrality issue tomorrow.

CBC Covers Net Neutrality Developments

CBC.ca continues its great coverage of the net neutrality issue with stories on the open letter by Charlie Angus and the Vuze report on Cogeco.

Angus Releases Public Letter on Net Neutrality

MP Charlie Angus has released a public letter to Industry Minister Jim Prentice urging the government to introduce a net neutrality provision into law.

Thursday April 3, 2008
Net Neutrality Raised During Question Period
NDP MP Charlie Angus posed a pair of questions about net neutrality to Industry Minister Jim Prentice during Question Period yesterday.  Prentice responded with a "we don't regulate the Internet" issue.  The Globe covers the exchange, oddly referring to the issue as "throddling." Update: Additional coverage from Canwest.
net neutrality in qp

NDP MP Charlie Angus posed a pair of questions about net neutrality to Industry Minister Jim Prentice during Question Period yesterday.  Prentice responded with a "we don't regulate the Internet" issue.  The Globe covers the exchange, oddly referring to the issue as "throddling."

Update: Additional coverage from Canwest.

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